Category Archives: Business Mistakes

10 Business Social Media Mistakes to Avoid

Everybody involved with business social media (or flirting with it) ought to read 10 Ways We’re Being Rude in Social Media and Don’t Even Know It by David Spark. Here’s his list (explanations are either mine, or in quotes):

  1. Friend collecting. David makes the point that friends and followers aren’t necessarily a measure of engagement or value. You can buy them. You can collect them with software-driven scripts and special tools. 
  2. Asking people to “like” your content-free Facebook page. What’s to like when there is nothing there? Put the content up first, then engage. 
  3. Requiring app installation to consume a message. For example, that greeting card that requires you install something. 
  4. Auto DMs on Twitter. He’s referring to the practice of setting your Twitter to automatically send a direct message to every new follower, thanking them, or — worse still — asking them to buy something from you. 
  5. Happy Birthdays on Facebook. David says: “Only typing ‘Happy Birthday’ is truly the least you could do outside of doing nothing.” And he adds that there is no extra credit for remembering when Facebook is reminding you. 
  6. Sharing without consumption. “We all have the ability to share any piece of content without looking past the headline.” Read it first. 
  7. Photo overdose of your kids and your wedding. “Your kid may be cute to you, but you’re the parent and that’s how you’re supposed to feel. The rest of us are not supposed to feel that way.” 
  8. Posting bad photos
  9. Follow Fridays. Hmmm. Honestly, I’ve been follow Fridayed and I’ve liked it. I thought of it as mutual back scratching. The #FF in a tweet followed by listing handles is a recommendation to your followers that they follow the people you list. But David points out that it’s really about getting the attention of the people you list. I think it’s kind of faded as a behavior anyway. 
  10. Automatically cross-posting contentless information across social networks. This should be higher on the list, in my opinion. Having foursquare post when you check in, or Spotify post what you’re listening to, for example: That’s just clutter. That stuff gets in the way. Don’t do that. 

Business Social Media is Inevitable

David Lacker reviews and summarizes Stanford research on business social media at the highest business levels.

Key findings: most companies are using social media, but it doesn’t get up to the board level. It’s new, interesting, but they’re waiting. Social media scares companies. But…

I think it is inevitable that [social media] is going to have an impact on companies.

If you don’t see the video here, click this link to see the original.

2 Pictures, 200 Words, Lots of Ideas.

Pictures, words, lots of ideas. If one picture equals 1,000 words, how many ideas does it generate? Is there a transitive property there? I had time over the weekend to pick up two unrelated pictures. Each covers something entirely different. Both are full of ideas.

The first, a chart by Seth Godin:

From Seth Godins Blog

From Seth Godin

This is one of those things that must have been hard to come up with, but makes sense when you look at it. A map of communication. On the horizontal axis of the chart, from book on one end to a conversation at the other. With a book, the writer writes it at one point in time and the reader reads it at an entirely different time. With the telephone and coaching, both parties of the communication, sender and receiver, are involved at the same time. On the chart’s vertical axis, how much bandwidth is involved, from mail and graffiti at the low extreme, to movies and coaching at the high extreme.

The Second, from Pingdom:

from pingdom.com

From pingdom.com

This one is one of several on that post — Report: Social Media Demographics 2012 — that are fascinating to me. As always with this kind of research, accuracy depends on how they sampled, but even if it could be off by a bit, it still gives a big picture of the main social networking sites (which is what I assume the acronym SNS stands for) usage by age. I have no conclusions to draw, but maybe you do. Apparently the more well-known platforms have older users, except Twitter spreads out over more ages. That same post has some interesting data on usage by gender, as well. Good stuff.

15 Grammar Goofs That Make You Look Bad

Whether you like it or not, silly or not, superficial or not, it’s sillier and more superficial to just ignore these obvious grammar goofs and think people who see them are just nitpicking. It’s about respecting your readers. That’s my opinion.

15 Grammar Goofs That Make You Look Silly
Like this infographic? Get more content marketing tips from Copyblogger.

This list and graphic is from CopyBlogger. You can click on the graphic to see the original.

And I Thought I was a Friend and Colleague…

Don’t you hate it when this happens? With social media and all, I connect with somebody, seems like a smart person, we have some email and even telephone interactions, and then, dammit, I end up as a prospect.

Sad. Quite a demotion. From friend and colleague to prospect.

You do know what I mean, right? A “dear Tim” message that’s obviously based on a single message barely customized to change the first names? And when you get it, don’t you feel just like I do, as in “Damn. I thought I was a friend and colleague. And it turns out I was just a prospect.”

Are you doing that with your email campaign? Or with Twitter, LinkedIn, or Facebook? Because if you are, then I’ll bet you it’s not working.

(Image: Blazej Lyjak/Shutterstock)

Damned Commercial Crap Threatens Social Media

The stupid comments that are just thinly-veiled ads, disguised as blog comments … the twitter traffic that’s just “buy me buy me” … like the spam that threatens to drown email altogether, it’s not just annoying. It’s destructive. It’s a damned shame.

Yesterday the comment here below was submitted …

comment

… as an addition to my post Revising the Root Canal Theory of Business Planning here, on this blog, last August. As you knew instantly (you being a human, who actually reads), that post is entirely about business planning, not at all about teeth or dentistry. The root canal is a metaphor.

While I love your comments on my blog – I encourage them, respond to them, thank you for them – I hate the increasingly common attempts to circumvent the so-called social media conversation with hidden agendas. Stupid fake comments. And that includes all those stupid generic-fake-praise comments plastered all over blogs for obvious self-serving SEO purposes. Scripts and bots, set loose, in this case crawling around the Web looking for “root canal” in posts, placing the commercial crap there. Pollution on purpose.

As far as I can tell, almost all blogs that allow comments have to be moderated these days because of all this commercial crap, essentially fake comments, advertisements masquerading as conversation. No wonder some of the highest-traffic blogs, like Seth Godin’s blog, don’t allow comments. This is what I was referring to earlier this month when I posted the problem with crowd sourcing is crowds.

Selfish, mean people have almost killed email with their sociopathic behavior. Now they’re after blogging and Twitter. A curse on all of their houses. Dammit.