Category Archives: Advertising

Real Numbers on Facebook Ads

My thanks to Forbes.com, for summarizing Facebook ad numbers. Forbes was reporting COO Sheryl Sandberg’s latest conference call with stock analysts. She quoted these numbers from a detailed study. 

Facebook ad numbers Sheryl Sandberg

  • media plans that included Facebook reached people who would not have seen the campaigns otherwise.  In fact, 45% of those reached were reached exclusively through Facebook.  
  • Facebook had a 68% lower cost per acquisition and drove 24% more new sales than other online channels. Facebook built a deep relationship with PepsiCo, working with its Lay’s brand to drive sales significantly ahead of plan and a 5x return on advertising spend for their ‘Do Us A Flavor’ campaign on Facebook. 
  • 65% of Facebook’s advertisers are now using ads in news feed, which run on both desktop and mobile, up from 50% at the end of the third quarter.  
  • Measurement work with Datalogix has shown that ads in news feed also drive more than 8x the incremental offline sales than ads on the right hand side.

Not surprising, but still … for people still wondering about business on Facebook. 

The Storytelling at the Heart of Future Marketing

My thanks to Social Media Today for embedding this video on their post titled 4 ways to prepare a Facebook content plan. That’s a good post, too. Especially this, prepared by Coca Cola, on what they call “passionate storytelling.” regarding future marketing. This is golden.

And what about a company of the size and scope of Coca Cola, one of the grand old brands that made traditional advertising great, a warlord of major media, sharing the intellectual highlights of its new-world thinking?

I’m impressed.

Here’s Some Good Advice About Cool Startups

Nice piece in Forbes from last week, called Your “Cool” Startup Sucks, by Brent Beshore. Great put-down for cool startups: 

Newsflash: your cool startup sucks. Cool doesn’t address a market need. Cool doesn’t solve a problem. Cool doesn’t generate revenue. Cool doesn’t allow you to see your deficiencies. Cool isn’t valuable. Cool is just, well, cool.

I really like his advice on this: 

 If you aim to move beyond cool, focus on what matters. Find a niche that is ripe for disruption. Seek transparent feedback from potential customers, not friends or family. Determine the key elements that must be accomplished to drive revenue and repeat customers. Focus on testing your hypothesis and tweaking your approach. Do those things and forget trying to be cool.

Well said. And especially his final put-down:

P.S. If you’d like to see the downfall of “coolness,” check out Bravo’s new show “Start-Ups: Silicon Valley.” It’s packed with cool.

Ouch.